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Edgar Allan Poe American Literature Analysis - Essay

Edgar Allan Poe American Literature Analysis

❶It is pattern that makes the separate elements of the work meaningful, not mere realistic cause and effect.

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Edgar Allan Poe's strong optimism
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By burying her, he splits himself off from actual life. As the story nears its horrifying climax, art and reality become even more intertwined. As the narrator reads to Roderick from a gothic romance, sounds referred to in the story are echoed in actuality as the entombed Madeline breaks out of her vault and stalks up the steps to confront her twin brother.

Madeline, Roderick, and the house all fall into the dark tarn, the abyss of nothingness, and become as if they had never been. Dupin, the great amateur detective created by Poe in this story, solves his first and most unusual case. The narrator, the forerunner of Dr. Watson of the Sherlock Holmes stories, meets Auguste Dupin in this story and very early recognizes that he has a double personality, a bi-part soul, for he is both wildly imaginative and coldly analytical.

The points about the murder that baffle the police are precisely those that enable Dupin to master the case: Dupin accounts for the first contradiction by deducing that the criminal must have been an animal; the second he explains by following a mode of reasoning based on a process of elimination to determine that apparent impossibilities are, in reality, possible after all.

When Dupin reveals that an escaped orangutan did the killing, the Paris Prefect of Police complains that Dupin should mind his own business. Dupin is content to have outwitted the prefect in his own realm; descendants of Dupin have been outwitting police inspectors ever since. Poe is often thought to be the author of stories about mad persons and murders, but attention is seldom given to the psychological nature of the madness in his stories.

The story is told in the first-person voice by the killer, who has obviously been locked up in a prison or in an insane asylum for his crime. He begins by arguing that he is not mad and that the calm way he committed the crime and can now tell about it testify to his sanity. He begins by assuring his listeners and readers that he loved the old man, that he did not want his gold, and that the old man had not abused him or insulted him.

He says that when the eye fell on him, his blood ran cold and that he made up his mind to kill the old man and rid himself of the eye forever.

Because the narrator provides no explanation for his extreme aversion to the eye, the reader must try to understand the motivation for the crime, and thus for the story itself, in the only way possible—by paying careful attention to the details of the story and trying to determine what thematic relationship they have to one another. The determination of those elements that have most relevance to the central effect of the story, and are thus true clues rather than mere irrelevant details, is the principle that governs the communication of all information—the principle of redundancy or repetition.

Because the narrator who tells the story is a man obsessed, those things that obsess him are repeated throughout the story. In order to understand why the narrator might wish to destroy himself by destroying the old man—which he does succeed in doing by the end of the story—one can turn back to the motifs of time and the tell-tale heart, which also dominate the story. Finally, there is the theme of the tell-tale heart itself—a heart that tells a tale. On the psychological level of the story, however, the tale that the heart tells that so obsesses the narrator is the tale that every heart tells.

That tale links the beating of the heart to the ticking of a clock, for every beat is a moment of time that brings one closer to death. The madness of the narrator in this story is similar to the madness of other Poe characters who long to escape the curse of time and mortality but find they can do so only by a corresponding loss of the self—a goal they both seek with eagerness and try to avoid with terror. The plot is relatively simple. Montresor seeks revenge on Fortunato for some unspecified insult by luring him down into his family vaults to inspect some wine he has purchased.

In fact, from the very beginning, every action and bit of dialogue is characterized as being just the opposite of what is explicitly stated. The action takes place during carnival season, a sort of Mardi Gras when everyone is in masquerade and thus appearing as something they are not. Montresor makes sure that his servants will not be at home to hinder his plot by giving them explicit orders not to leave, and he makes sure that Fortunato will follow him into the wine cellar by playing on his pride and by urging him not to go.

Moreover, the fact that Montresor knows how his plot is going to end makes it possible for him to play little ironic tricks on Fortunato. When Fortunato makes a gesture indicating that he is a member of the secret society of Masons, Montresor claims that he is also and proves it by revealing a trowel, the sign of his plot to wall up Fortunato. The irony of the story cuts much deeper than this, however. At the beginning, Montresor makes much of the fact that there are two criteria for a successful revenge—that the avenger must punish without being punished in return and that he must make himself known as an avenger to the one who has done him the wrong.

Nowhere in the story, however, does Montresor tell Fortunato that he is walling him up to fulfill his need for revenge; in fact, Fortunato seems to have no idea why he is being punished at all. The ultimate irony of the story then, is that, although Montresor has tried to fulfill his two criteria for a successful revenge, Fortunato has fulfilled them better than he has. Moreover, although Montresor now tells the story as a final confession to save his soul, the gleeful tone with which he tells it—a tone that suggests he is enjoying the telling of it in the present as much as he enjoyed committing the act in the past—means that it is not a good confession.

John Allan dies in and no mention of Edgar is made on his will. In he brings his cousin Virginia, and her mom to live with him in Richmond, in the same year, he marries Virginia. He is 27 and she is Still no financial gratification for his works. He left the magazine in , with ambitions of starting his own Magazine, which failed miserably. He had some gigs by publishing some of his short stories, but never real money came from it. Poe barely had money to maintain his family. Everything collapsed on him when Virginia gets sick.

Virginia, always being the first of all of his passions. By all accounts Edgar and Virginia were deeply in love with one another and played together almost as children.

It is believed they did not have marital relations until she turned Edgar directed her education, tutoring her in the classics and mathematics. In addition, she took singing and piano lessons, developing a beautiful voice. On January 20, , while living in Philadelphia, Virginia began playing the piano and singing to her husband. Suddenly, she began to cough and blood gushed from her mouth.

He is famously remembered being financially and personally irresponsible which, as might be expected, interfered with what attempts he made at gainful employment. He also struggled with gambling for a time, acquiring considerable debts Ingram This set the tone for much of his future financial state. He is also considered one of the first American author to attempt writing as a sole source of income, something which he struggled with woefully because the publishing industry was entirely unsuited to his writing style and literary devices Ingram.

Writing never made him wealthy and these other aspects of his character contributed to lifelong poverty. Those who remembered him, even toward the end of his life when he arguably had the least to be optimistic about, he was regarded fondly by those who knew him. His mother-in-law and an acquaintance he made very near the end, a Mrs. Weiss, considered him to be the peak of gentlemanly behavior and a surprisingly cheerful and good-natured fellow, respectively Ingram These positive opinions appear to indicate Poe a pleasant person, in spite of his flaws.

His own academic writing is also a window into the deep-rooted optimism of Edgar Allan Poe. An argument could be made that Poe wrote in the Gothic style because that is what sold at the time. For example, The Fall of the House of Usher had dark, Gothic overtones and could easily be classified as horror fiction today. There can be no misunderstanding about the essays he published, however.

He wrote many articles of literary criticism, particularly with regards to poetry which indicate cheerful tastes. Proof of his passion is evident both in the fury of his own work and in the gentle rationalization behind that fury. According to his own reasoning, the point of the poem is pleasure through beauty, even if that beauty is dark and tragic. He makes this point despite the earlier mentioned loss of his mother and sister and his frequent difficulties with money.

It has often been a curse of writers and scholars that they consider their beloved intellects a thing above the common man.

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- Biography of Edgar Allan Poe Edgar Allan Poe is a man who is considered to be a true American genius of our time, and by many, the personification of death. His works have been collected and celebrated for over a hundred years from this day.

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Essays and criticism on Edgar Allan Poe, including the works “The Fall of the House of Usher”, “The Murders in the Rue Morgue”, “The Tell .

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A comprehensive collection of Poe's Essays, Sketches and Lectures, with variants and bibliographies. Edgar Allan Poe - Essays on the short stories and poems of Edgar Allan Poe.

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Edgar Allan Poe is regarded as, among many things, a master of dark fiction. His poems and stories chill the blood, even today. This short essay written on the life of the famous American poet offers great insight into his life and passions.. Edgar Allan Poe 5/5(4). Feb 13,  · Free Essays from Bartleby | Edgar Allan Poe "The boundaries which divide Life and Death are at best shadowy and vague. Who .